Tag Archives: Sarah Sundin

When Tides Turn by Sarah Sundin

When Tides Turn book cover

Quintessa Beaumont decides to help out with the Navy WAVES (Women Accepted for Voluntary Emergency Service) to do her part for World War II. As she is working to prove herself, she is forced to work with Dan Avery, who is more concerned with his goal to make admiral than helping her. But when Quintessa discovers a possible spy link in the Navy, she tries to enlist Dan’s help, hoping he can set aside his career advancement to assist her in a dangerous mission.

I have enjoyed the first two novels in this series and was excited to read more about Tess. She is determined to prove she is more than a pretty face and I admired her gumption and tenacity in this book. I enjoyed getting to know the characters and appreciated the depth the author invested into their personalities. The passion of the characters combined with the interesting detailed history makes for a fascinating read. I also liked the suspense and mystery interspersed in the story. Combined with hidden romance and true spiritual struggles, this novel is a great read. Recommended to all lovers of historical fiction!

I received a copy of this book from Netgalley/Revell Publishing in exchange for an honest review.

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Anchor in the Storm by Sarah Sundin

Anchor in the Storm book cover

Lillian Avery has struggled her whole life to prove herself since an accident at a young age damaged her physically. She successfully becomes a pharmacist despite opposition for her gender and condition and manages to secure a position in Boston with the help of her brother. Upon arriving, however, she discovers that she still has much to prove to her new boss. As strange events begin to occur in the pharmacy, she seeks the help of her brother’s friend Archer Vandenberg, the wealthy sailor who spends his life demonstrating that he is more than simply money. Despite his own nightmares after battles at sea, Arch agrees to help the courageous Lillian, neither of them realizing how deep they must go in order to do the right thing, battling their own personal trials along the way.

I enjoy every novel by Sarah Sundin because she writes with a perfect blend of history and romance, creating characters that possess significant depth, struggle with realistic trials, and emerge with great growth and maturity. They are easy to connect with and challenge me in my own spiritual journey. One critique for this story in particular is that I did not like the final trial that Arch faces; I found that the book would not have been hindered if he did not face this situation and it felt a bit forced and too coincidental to be realistic for me. Overall, however, I did really like this book and was pleased to see a few characters from previous novels in this series, which, although also enjoyable, do not necessarily need to be read first. I recommended this book to all lovers of historical fiction!

I received a copy of this book from Revell Publishing in exchange for an honest review.

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Through Waters Deep by Sarah Sundin

In 1941 America, the United States is torn between its fragile neutrality, resistance to World War II, and desires to join the fight. Outgoing naval officer Jim Avery dreams of leading a bright crew of young men to assist England in her war efforts. He is surprised to run into his childhood friend, Mary Stirling, while docked in Boston for several weeks. Mary is beautiful and reserved, but has a quite spunk that comes in handy with her job as a naval secretary. As tensions begin to rise over the war, Mary uses her anonymity and skills as a secretary to notate various crewmembers actions and attitudes. But when real danger arises on Jim’s ship, her scribbles and observances may be vital to saving lives, thrusting her usual timid self her right into the middle of the action.

Sarah Sundin is a great storyteller. Her novels seamlessly weave together fascinating history, Biblical principles, and exciting romance. I enjoyed learning about the details surrounding the early months of 1941 America, with particular attention to the jobs and duties of naval officers. The plot contains enough mystery that it is difficult to foresee the true villain. The characters also undergo significant growth and development, which truly creates a story that is realistic, relatable, and interesting. Another twist also makes the romance a bit unpredictable, adding to the delight of the story. Personally, I enjoyed the relationship and camaraderie of the characters a bit better in In Perfect Time (another great read by the same author), but this book is still very enjoyable! I look forward to the next novel in the series. Highly recommended!

I received a copy of this book from Revell Publishing in exchange for an honest review.

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In Perfect Time by Sarah Sundin

Flight nurse Lt. Kay Jobson has a passion for healing those in war and a passion for good-looking men. She avoids commitment, however, and leaves behind a string of broken hearts. Yet handsome Lt. Roger Cooper seems to be immune to her good looks and flirtatious ways. As Kay becomes determined to win his heart, she discovers that focusing on physical appearance is dissatisfying and empty. Through heartache and danger, she learns to come to terms with her past while questioning her spiritual life for the first time. Roger, meanwhile, struggles to overcome negative events in his own past and avoid Kay’s charms even as he learns that God may have a different plan for his life.

In Perfect Time is a wonderful novel with significant depth that addresses difficult personal struggles that many readers may find applicable. Ms. Sundin does a fantastic job of communicating great spiritual truths without being preachy. It takes true talent to deliver such emotional messages so well and Ms. Sundin does so impeccably. The characters contain a perfect amount of complexity that makes the personalities believable and loveable. Their vulnerabilities and emotional trials are artfully told and illustrated. The plot is not predictable with its constant surprises and suspense and is also multifaceted in nature. It is a difficult novel to put down! The story flows naturally and flawlessly and offers interesting historical insight and detail into the roles of pilots and flight nurses during WWII. This novel may stand alone, but the first two books in the series give more background on a few additional characters. The book is most highly recommended!

I received a copy of this book from Revell Publishing in exchange for an honest review.

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